demanding the impossible

in solidarity with all who resist

Sep 30
breenewsome:

From Hong Kong to Ferguson: Justice now! Freedom now! Democracy now! Human rights now! Peace now! Equality now!

breenewsome:

From Hong Kong to Ferguson: Justice now! Freedom now! Democracy now! Human rights now! Peace now! Equality now!

(via illuminati-who)


Sep 29

thepeoplesrecord:

Hong Kong’s unprecedented protests & police crackdown, explained
September 29, 2014

Protest marches and vigils are fairly common in Hong Kong, but what began on Friday and escalated dramatically on Sunday is unprecedented. Mass acts of civil disobedience were met by a shocking and swift police response, which has led to clashes in the streets and popular outrage so great that analysts can only guess at what will happen next.

What’s going on in Hong Kong right now is a very big deal, and for reasons that go way beyond just this weekend’s protests. Hong Kong’s citizens are protesting to keep their promised democratic rights, which they worry — with good reason — could be taken away by the central Chinese government in Beijing. This moment is a sort of standoff between Hong Kong and China over the city’s future, a confrontation that they have been building toward for almost 20 years.

On Wednesday, student groups led peaceful marches to protest China’s new plan for Hong Kong’s 2017 election, which looked like China reneging on its promise to grant the autonomous region full democracy (see the next section for what that plan was such a big deal). Protest marches are pretty common in Hong Kong so it didn’t seem so unusual at first.

Things started escalating on Friday. Members of a protest group called Occupy Central (Central is the name of Hong Kong’s downtown district) had planned to launch a “civil disobedience” campaign on October 1, a national holiday celebrating communist China’s founding. But as the already-ongoing protesters escalated they decided to go for it now. On Friday, protesters peacefully occupied the forecourt (a courtyard-style open area in front of an office building) of Hong Kong’s city government headquarters along with other downtown areas.

The really important thing is what happened next: Hong Kong’s police cracked down with surprising force, fighting in the streets with protesters and eventually emerging with guns that, while likely filled with rubber bullets, look awfully militaristic. In response, outraged Hong Kong residents flooded into the streets to join the protesters, and on Sunday police blanketed Central with tear gas, which has been seen as a shocking and outrageous escalation. The Chinese central government issued a statement endorsing the police actions, as did Hong Kong’s pro-Beijing chief executive, a tacit signal that Beijing wishes for the protests to be cleared.

You have to remember that this is Hong Kong: an affluent and orderly place that prides itself on its civility and its freedom. Hong Kongers have a bit of a superiority complex when it comes to China, and see themselves as beyond the mainland’s authoritarianism and disorder. But there is also deep, deep anxiety that this could change, that Hong Kong could lose its special status, and this week’s events have hit on those anxieties to their core.

This began in 1997, when the United Kingdom handed over Hong Kong, one of its last imperial possessions, to the Chinese government. Hong Kong had spent over 150 years under British rule; it had become a fabulously wealthy center of commerce and had enjoyed, while not full democracy, far more freedom and democracy than the rest of China. So, as part of the handover, the Chinese government in Beijing promised to let Hong Kong keep its special rights and its autonomy — a deal known as “one country, two systems.”

A big part of that deal was China’s promise that, in 2017, Hong Kong’s citizens would be allowed to democratically elect their top leader for the first time ever. That leader, known as the Hong Kong chief executive, is currently appointed by a pro-Beijing committee. In 2007, the Chinese government reaffirmed its promise to give Hong Kong this right in 2017, which in Hong Kong is referred to as universal suffrage — a sign of how much value people assign to it.

But there have been disturbing signs throughout this year that the central Chinese government might renege on its promise. In July, the Chinese government issued a “white paper” stating that it has “comprehensive jurisdiction” over Hong Kong and that “the high degree of autonomy of [Hong Kong] is not an inherent power, but one that comes solely from the authorization by the central leadership.” It sounded to many like a warning from Beijing that it could dilute or outright revoke Hong Kong’s freedoms, and tens of thousands of Hong Kong’s citizens marched in protest.

Then, in August, Beijing announced its plan for Hong Kong’s 2017 elections. While citizens would be allowed to vote for the chief executive, the candidates for the election would have to be approved by a special committee just like the pro-Beijing committee that currently appoints the chief executive. This lets Beijing hand-pick candidates for the job, which is anti-democratic in itself, but also feels to many in Hong Kong like a first step toward eroding their promised democratic rights.

Full article
Photo 1, 2, 3

(via citizen-earth)


Sep 27

(via dreamymami)


Nov 15
citizen-earth:

Imgur user plamentanev posted this image from Bulgaria on Wednesday. He described the scene:
"This photo really moved me so much that I decided to try and raise awarenes to what is going on in my country. This girl was crying and begging the policeman not to hit her or any of her friends. Then the policeman started crying as well and he said to her: "You just hold on girl.""
The photo comes from protests happening in Bulgaria right now. Students are protesting poverty and corruption in Bulgaria’s Socialist-backed government, chaining themselves to the doors of Sofia University and clashing with police outside of parliament.
(via Buzzfeed)

citizen-earth:

Imgur user plamentanev posted this image from Bulgaria on Wednesday. He described the scene:

"This photo really moved me so much that I decided to try and raise awarenes to what is going on in my country. This girl was crying and begging the policeman not to hit her or any of her friends. Then the policeman started crying as well and he said to her: "You just hold on girl.""

The photo comes from protests happening in Bulgaria right now. Students are protesting poverty and corruption in Bulgaria’s Socialist-backed government, chaining themselves to the doors of Sofia University and clashing with police outside of parliament.

(via Buzzfeed)


Oct 14

Oct 6

thinkmexican:

Evo Morales Calls On Supporters in US to Help End American Imperialism

Bolivian President Evo Morales called on supporters in the United States to help bring an end to the policies of the U.S. government considered demeaning and imperialistic upon his return from Europe on Wednesday.

“It’s important to find alliances with the people [of the United States], with migrants to be our allies — to finish with the policies that seek to dominate and humiliate nations around the world,” Morales told a group of supporters at El Alto International Airport outside La Paz.

Evo is asking for your support. Are you willing to stand with him?

Stay Connected: Twitter | Facebook

(via thepeoplesrecord)


Sep 23

Sep 12
fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

New anti-government protests emerge in Turkey
Police used water cannons and tear gas overnight Wednesday in a bid to break up fresh anti-government protests across Turkey, media said.
Thousands of people angry over the death of a 22-year-old demonstrator in southern Turkey on Monday clashed with police in Istanbul, the capital Ankara, the western city of Izmir as well as in the southern cities of Mersin and Atakya.
In Istanbul, where an unprecedented wave of anti-government protests erupted in June, around a thousand protesters clashed with police who fired tear gas and water cannons, the CNN-Turk television channel reported.
Several protesters were hurt and around 20 were arrested during the demonstrations in Kadikoy Square, it said.
In Izmir, a large city in the west, more than 2,500 people marched through the city center in defiance of police who fired tear gas, the newspaper Hurriyet said.
It said the crowd shouted “AKP murderer,” denouncing the governing Islamic-rooted Justice and Development Party (AKP).
Similar clashes occurred in Ankara, Mersin and in Antakya, the city in southern Turkey near the Syrian border where Ahmet Atakan, 22, died Monday night.

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

New anti-government protests emerge in Turkey

Police used water cannons and tear gas overnight Wednesday in a bid to break up fresh anti-government protests across Turkey, media said.

Thousands of people angry over the death of a 22-year-old demonstrator in southern Turkey on Monday clashed with police in Istanbul, the capital Ankara, the western city of Izmir as well as in the southern cities of Mersin and Atakya.

In Istanbul, where an unprecedented wave of anti-government protests erupted in June, around a thousand protesters clashed with police who fired tear gas and water cannons, the CNN-Turk television channel reported.

Several protesters were hurt and around 20 were arrested during the demonstrations in Kadikoy Square, it said.

In Izmir, a large city in the west, more than 2,500 people marched through the city center in defiance of police who fired tear gas, the newspaper Hurriyet said.

It said the crowd shouted “AKP murderer,” denouncing the governing Islamic-rooted Justice and Development Party (AKP).

Similar clashes occurred in Ankara, Mersin and in Antakya, the city in southern Turkey near the Syrian border where Ahmet Atakan, 22, died Monday night.

(via citizen-earth)


Sep 11

archiemcphee:

Something awesome recently happened in Istanbul, Turkey. As a city with many hills, Istanbul is home to lots of long staircases that intersect its centuries-old neighbourhoods, enabling pedestrians to avoid streets filled with heavy car traffic.

Last week Huseyin Cetinel, a retired forestry engineer, decided to paint the stairs connecting the neighbourhoods of Findikli and Cihangir all the colors of the rainbow.

"He told the local news media that his original motivation for applying a fresh coat of paint to the stairs was not activism, but the desire “to make people smile.” Mr. Cetinel said he spent nearly $800 on paint and devoted four days to sprucing up the stairs, with help from his son-in-law.”

Public reaction to the colourful stairs was overwhelmingly positive. People turned out in droves to pose for photos on the cheerful staircase. Some decided it was a gesture of support and call for equal rights for the city’s LGBTQ community.

But then sometime strange happened. Just a few days after Huseyin finished beautifying the staircase, residents woke up to discover that overnight the city had hastily re-painted the rainbow steps a dull, disheartening gray. The gray cover-up was so secret and sudden that locals took it very personally. It was interpreted as “a sign of intolerance and a lack of respect for their right to claim public space.”

Speaking to Turkish television reporters after the stairs were painted over, Mr. Cetinel pointed out that all of nature — “cats, birds, flowers, mountains” — is brightly colored. “Where does this gray come from?” he asked. “Did we have another Pompeii and got flooded with ash?”

What happened next is what’s really awesome. Residents began to organize with each other via twitter and soon, not only were Huseyin Cetinel’s stairs returned to their rainbow glory, but - as a sign of solidarity - entirely different stairways all over the city, and eventually in other Turkish cities as well, were painted too.

Click here to view more photos of Istanbul’s new rainbow staircases.

[via Street Art Utopia and The New York Times]

(via absurdlakefront)


Sep 5

amodernmanifesto:

Taksim Commune: Gezi Park And The Uprising In Turkey

Since the end of May 2013, political unrest has swept across Turkey. In Istanbul, a large part of the central Beyoğlu district became a battle zone for three consecutive weeks with conflicts continuing afterward. So far five people have died and thousands have been injured.

The protests were initially aimed at rescuing Istanbul’s Gezi Park from being demolished as part of a large scale urban renewal project. The police used extreme force during a series of police attacks that began on May 28th 2013 and which came to a dramatic head in the early morning hours of Friday May 31st when police attacked protesters sleeping in the park.

Over the course of a few days, the police attacks grew to shocking proportions. As the images of the heavy-handed policing spread across the world, the protests quickly transformed into a popular uprising against the Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan and his style of authoritarian rule.

This short documentary tells the story of the occupation of Gezi Park, the eviction on July 15, 2013, and the protests that have continued in the aftermath. It includes interviews with many participants and footage never before seen.


Sep 4
“Tell me when have invaders brought freedom?” Khaled al-Khalifa, a Syrian novelist on the prospect of Western intervention, from here (with grammatical editing).  (via eternalunfolding)

(via culturerevo)


Aug 28
the-lone-pamphleteer:

Calif. Prisons Given Go-Ahead to Force-Feed Inmates on Hunger Strikeby Sarah Lazare for commondreams.org
Human rights advocates slammed a judge’s decision Monday to give California prison officials the green light to force-feed prisoners who are on hunger strike by deeming “do not resuscitate” orders signed by inmates invalid.“This [court decision] violates all international laws and standards and gives the medical director of each prison authority to violate human rights laws instead of reasonably negotiating with prisoners,” declared Claude Marks of the Prisoner Hunger Strike Solidarity Coalition.
The ruling, passed by U.S. District Court Judge Thelton E. Henderson in response to requests from state authorities, contradicts a California state law explicitly prohibiting force-feedings for prisoners who signed orders that they be allowed to die.
State officials argued in the courts that prisoners signed the papers under coercion by what they allege is gang control, and the judge acquiesced, ruling that the “do not resuscitate” orders no longer have legal standing.
Prisoners and their allies charge that unproven claims of gang coercion are levied by prison authorities in attempt to break the hunger strike, dehumanize inmates and justify cruel collective punishment.
“CDCR’s [the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation’s] approach is hopeless and dangerous,” declared Azadeh Zohrabi, spokesperson for the Prisoner Hunger Strike Solidarity Coalition. “It perpetuates a logic that says it is okay to torture someone based on their criminal convictions. It creates prison conditions that destroy people physically and mentally, and arbitrarily metes out punishment that exceeds any sentences passed down by the courts.”
Human rights advocates slammed the practice of force-feeding that has been condemned as a violation of international law by subjecting inmates to cruel and torturous punishment. The process involves “snaking feeding tubes through inmates’ noses and into their stomachs,” the AP reports.
"Force-feeding violates international law to the extent that it involves somebody who doesn’t give their consent," declared Jules Lobel, president of the Center for Constitutional Rights, who represents 10 inmates suing to end prolonged solitary confinement at Pelican Bay State Prison.
The issue was thrust into the media spotlight due to the the controversial and widely condemned force-feeding of Guantanamo Bay inmates on hunger strike. “This approach [in California], much like Guantanamo, sets the U.S. apart from all related international human rights standards,” Marks declared.
There is no data on rates of force-feedings in U.S. prisons, but this is not the first time U.S. courts have intervened to give the go-ahead for the controversial practice.
While the number of hunger striking prisoners is consistently under-counted, the media is widely reporting that at least 69 inmates have consistently gone without food since the California prison hunger strikes were launched July 8.
In the third major prisoner hunger strike in the state since 2011, prisoners are demanding an end to solitary confinement, as well as a halt to collective punishments, harsh crackdowns under the auspices of ‘stopping gang activities,’ and access to education, healthcare and healthy food.

the-lone-pamphleteer:

Calif. Prisons Given Go-Ahead to Force-Feed Inmates on Hunger Strike
by Sarah Lazare for commondreams.org

Human rights advocates slammed a judge’s decision Monday to give California prison officials the green light to force-feed prisoners who are on hunger strike by deeming “do not resuscitate” orders signed by inmates invalid.“This [court decision] violates all international laws and standards and gives the medical director of each prison authority to violate human rights laws instead of reasonably negotiating with prisoners,” declared Claude Marks of the Prisoner Hunger Strike Solidarity Coalition.

The ruling, passed by U.S. District Court Judge Thelton E. Henderson in response to requests from state authorities, contradicts a California state law explicitly prohibiting force-feedings for prisoners who signed orders that they be allowed to die.

State officials argued in the courts that prisoners signed the papers under coercion by what they allege is gang control, and the judge acquiesced, ruling that the “do not resuscitate” orders no longer have legal standing.

Prisoners and their allies charge that unproven claims of gang coercion are levied by prison authorities in attempt to break the hunger strike, dehumanize inmates and justify cruel collective punishment.

“CDCR’s [the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation’s] approach is hopeless and dangerous,” declared Azadeh Zohrabi, spokesperson for the Prisoner Hunger Strike Solidarity Coalition. “It perpetuates a logic that says it is okay to torture someone based on their criminal convictions. It creates prison conditions that destroy people physically and mentally, and arbitrarily metes out punishment that exceeds any sentences passed down by the courts.”

Human rights advocates slammed the practice of force-feeding that has been condemned as a violation of international law by subjecting inmates to cruel and torturous punishment. The process involves “snaking feeding tubes through inmates’ noses and into their stomachs,” the AP reports.

"Force-feeding violates international law to the extent that it involves somebody who doesn’t give their consent," declared Jules Lobel, president of the Center for Constitutional Rights, who represents 10 inmates suing to end prolonged solitary confinement at Pelican Bay State Prison.

The issue was thrust into the media spotlight due to the the controversial and widely condemned force-feeding of Guantanamo Bay inmates on hunger strike. “This approach [in California], much like Guantanamo, sets the U.S. apart from all related international human rights standards,” Marks declared.

There is no data on rates of force-feedings in U.S. prisons, but this is not the first time U.S. courts have intervened to give the go-ahead for the controversial practice.

While the number of hunger striking prisoners is consistently under-counted, the media is widely reporting that at least 69 inmates have consistently gone without food since the California prison hunger strikes were launched July 8.

In the third major prisoner hunger strike in the state since 2011, prisoners are demanding an end to solitary confinement, as well as a halt to collective punishments, harsh crackdowns under the auspices of ‘stopping gang activities,’ and access to education, healthcare and healthy food.

(via inspirement)


Aug 22
thepeoplesrecord:

'I am Chelsea Manning,' says jailed soldier formerly known as BradleyAugust 22, 2013
The US soldier who was sentenced as Bradley Manning on Wednesday plans to undergo hormone therapy and has asked to be recognised as a woman.
In a statement on Thursday Manning said she would like to be known as Chelsea E Manning and be referred to by female pronouns.
"As I transition into this next phase of my life, I want everyone to know the real me," she wrote.
"I am Chelsea Manning. I am a female. Given the way that I feel, and have felt since childhood, I want to begin hormone therapy as soon as possible. I hope that you will support me in this transition."
But Fort Leavenworth military prison in Kansas, where Manning is due to serve out her sentence, said on Thursday that it would not provide trans treatment beyond psychiatric support, in a move criticised as unconstitutional by activists and LGBT groups.
Manning was sentenced to 35 years in prison on Wednesday for leaking hundreds of thousands of classified documents. She was found guilty of 20 counts, six of them under the Espionage Act, but her lawyers argued during the trial that Manning was acting out of a sense of duty to her country.
"I also request that, starting today, you refer to me by my new name and use the feminine pronoun (except in official mail to the confinement facility)," Manning’s statement read. "I look forward to receiving letters from supporters and having the opportunity to write back."
She thanked her supporters for helping to “keep me strong” during her arrest and trial and for funding her defense.
During her trial it emerged that Manning had emailed a picture of herself, wearing a long blonde wig and lipstick, to her supervisor. In the subject line Manning had written: “My Problem”.
Manning’s lawyers argued that this was an example of how the soldier’s supervisors failed her on numerous occasions and contributed to the stress she was under.
"The stress that [she] was under was mostly to give context to what was going on at the time," Manning’s lawyer, David Coombs, told NBC’s Today show on Thursday.
"It was never an excuse because that’s not what drove [her] actions. What drove [her] actions was a strong moral compass."
Manning has already spent three and a half years in prison awaiting trial.Her sentence was reduced by 112 days in January after a judge ruled she had been subjected to excessively harsh treatment in military detention.
Coombs has confirmed that Manning will spend her sentence at Fort Leavenworth military prison, however a spokeswoman for the prison said this week that treatment for inmates at the prison does not include hormone therapy.
"All inmates are considered soldiers and are treated as such with access to mental health professionals, including a psychiatrist, psychologist, social workers and behavioral science noncommissioned officers with experience in addressing the needs of military personnel in pre- and post-trial confinement," Kimberly Lewis told Courthouse News Service.
"The army does not provide hormone therapy or sex-reassignment surgery for gender identity disorder."
Coombs said on Thursday that he is “hoping” that Fort Leavenworth “would do the right thing” and provide hormone therapy.
"If Fort Leavenworth does not, then I’m going to do everything in my power to make sure they are forced to do so."
Trans and civil liberties groups said it would be “unconstitutional” for Fort Leavenworth not to give Manning treatment.
"This is the United States. We do not deny medical treatment to prisoners," said Mara Keisling, executive director of the National National Center for Transgender Equality.
"It is illegal, it’s unconstitutional. That is fairly settled law under the eighth amendment against cruel and unusual punishment. The medical community is now unified that transition-related care is legitimate medical care that can successfully treat a serious underlying condition."
The American Civil Liberties Union said Manning had been diagnosed with gender dysphoria and should receive hormone therapy. Statements by Fort Leavenworth to the contrary raise “serious constitutional concerns”, said Chase Strangio, an attorney with the union’s LGBT project.
"The official policy of the Federal Bureau of Prisons and most state agencies is to provide medically necessary care for the treatment of gender dysphoria, and courts have consistently found that denying such care to prisoners based on blanket exclusions violates the eighth amendment of the constitution."
Aside from the issue of treatment, Keisling said there was a “systemic problem” with how the justice system treats trans people, who she said face a “heightened amount of sexual assault” in both federal and military prisons.
"Trans people tend to be treated unfairly in terms of arrests, in terms of prosecution, in terms of conviction, sentencing and their time in jails and prison. It’s a dramatically serious problem that Americans don’t know about."Trans prisoners should undergo an “individualised assessment”, she said, to determine how they should be incarcerated.
"It is a much more complicated than trans women should be in women’s prisons and trans men should be in men’s prisons.
"They should take into account what will be more safe for the prisoner. They need to look at things like a prisoners’ past history of being a victim or of victimising other people.
"They need to look at the person’s self-assessment of where they would be safe. They need to look at a person’s gender identity, they need to look at a person’s sexual orientation."
Source

thepeoplesrecord:

'I am Chelsea Manning,' says jailed soldier formerly known as Bradley
August 22, 2013

The US soldier who was sentenced as Bradley Manning on Wednesday plans to undergo hormone therapy and has asked to be recognised as a woman.

In a statement on Thursday Manning said she would like to be known as Chelsea E Manning and be referred to by female pronouns.

"As I transition into this next phase of my life, I want everyone to know the real me," she wrote.

"I am Chelsea Manning. I am a female. Given the way that I feel, and have felt since childhood, I want to begin hormone therapy as soon as possible. I hope that you will support me in this transition."

But Fort Leavenworth military prison in Kansas, where Manning is due to serve out her sentence, said on Thursday that it would not provide trans treatment beyond psychiatric support, in a move criticised as unconstitutional by activists and LGBT groups.

Manning was sentenced to 35 years in prison on Wednesday for leaking hundreds of thousands of classified documents. She was found guilty of 20 counts, six of them under the Espionage Act, but her lawyers argued during the trial that Manning was acting out of a sense of duty to her country.

"I also request that, starting today, you refer to me by my new name and use the feminine pronoun (except in official mail to the confinement facility)," Manning’s statement read. "I look forward to receiving letters from supporters and having the opportunity to write back."

She thanked her supporters for helping to “keep me strong” during her arrest and trial and for funding her defense.

During her trial it emerged that Manning had emailed a picture of herself, wearing a long blonde wig and lipstick, to her supervisor. In the subject line Manning had written: “My Problem”.

Manning’s lawyers argued that this was an example of how the soldier’s supervisors failed her on numerous occasions and contributed to the stress she was under.

"The stress that [she] was under was mostly to give context to what was going on at the time," Manning’s lawyer, David Coombs, told NBC’s Today show on Thursday.

"It was never an excuse because that’s not what drove [her] actions. What drove [her] actions was a strong moral compass."

Manning has already spent three and a half years in prison awaiting trial.Her sentence was reduced by 112 days in January after a judge ruled she had been subjected to excessively harsh treatment in military detention.

Coombs has confirmed that Manning will spend her sentence at Fort Leavenworth military prison, however a spokeswoman for the prison said this week that treatment for inmates at the prison does not include hormone therapy.

"All inmates are considered soldiers and are treated as such with access to mental health professionals, including a psychiatrist, psychologist, social workers and behavioral science noncommissioned officers with experience in addressing the needs of military personnel in pre- and post-trial confinement," Kimberly Lewis told Courthouse News Service.

"The army does not provide hormone therapy or sex-reassignment surgery for gender identity disorder."

Coombs said on Thursday that he is “hoping” that Fort Leavenworth “would do the right thing” and provide hormone therapy.

"If Fort Leavenworth does not, then I’m going to do everything in my power to make sure they are forced to do so."

Trans and civil liberties groups said it would be “unconstitutional” for Fort Leavenworth not to give Manning treatment.

"This is the United States. We do not deny medical treatment to prisoners," said Mara Keisling, executive director of the National National Center for Transgender Equality.

"It is illegal, it’s unconstitutional. That is fairly settled law under the eighth amendment against cruel and unusual punishment. The medical community is now unified that transition-related care is legitimate medical care that can successfully treat a serious underlying condition."

The American Civil Liberties Union said Manning had been diagnosed with gender dysphoria and should receive hormone therapy. Statements by Fort Leavenworth to the contrary raise “serious constitutional concerns”, said Chase Strangio, an attorney with the union’s LGBT project.

"The official policy of the Federal Bureau of Prisons and most state agencies is to provide medically necessary care for the treatment of gender dysphoria, and courts have consistently found that denying such care to prisoners based on blanket exclusions violates the eighth amendment of the constitution."

Aside from the issue of treatment, Keisling said there was a “systemic problem” with how the justice system treats trans people, who she said face a “heightened amount of sexual assault” in both federal and military prisons.

"Trans people tend to be treated unfairly in terms of arrests, in terms of prosecution, in terms of conviction, sentencing and their time in jails and prison. It’s a dramatically serious problem that Americans don’t know about."

Trans prisoners should undergo an “individualised assessment”, she said, to determine how they should be incarcerated.

"It is a much more complicated than trans women should be in women’s prisons and trans men should be in men’s prisons.

"They should take into account what will be more safe for the prisoner. They need to look at things like a prisoners’ past history of being a victim or of victimising other people.

"They need to look at the person’s self-assessment of where they would be safe. They need to look at a person’s gender identity, they need to look at a person’s sexual orientation."

Source


Aug 12

thepeoplesrecord:

Email services close and destroy data rather than reveal information
August 12, 2013

Lavabit, a Texas-based service that was reportedly used by Edward J. Snowden, announced the suspension of its service Thursday afternoon to avoid being “complicit in crimes against the American people,” The New York Times reports.

Within hours, a fast-growing Maryland-based start-up called Silent Circle also closed its e-mail service and destroyed its e-mail servers.

In effect, both businesses destroyed their assets — in part or in full — to avoid turning over  data of powerful clients.

In an effort to address public concern about the government’s surveillance programs, President Obama on Friday announced the creation of a task force to advise the government about how to ‘balance security and privacy’. Many understand this to mean that they plan to reboot the programs under different names and maintain a climate of secrecy and lies while continuing to pursue whistle-blowers relentlessly. Obama also claimed he supported a proposal to change the procedures of the secret court that approves electronic spying under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act.

Source

As Assange has been saying, any changes made as a direct result of Snowden’s leaks PROVE that Snowden is in fact a whistle-blower (perhaps the most influential in American history) and not an enemy of the United States or whatever the hell they’re calling him now. 


Aug 11

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